Black History


Me, not Black, but a proud Taino lady.

Why should I celebrate Black History?

 

My forefathers didn’t suffer through a middle passage

But I am saddened to hear about your suffrage.

We were not brought from somewhere to over there

My ancestors were already living here.

When the discoverers, actually murderers, came

Discovering for their queen, they claimed.

Those Thieves, Murderers, Plunderers, Rapists.

Yes, I have all rights to call them this.

 

Me, not Black, but a proud Taino lady.

Why should I celebrate Black History?

 

They plundered our Taino villages

They treated us like savages

They said we were lazy

Cause we wouldn’t work for free

They raped my sisters, used them like pieces of meat

Tied up my brothers to stakes in the heat

And I wonder if their queen ever knew

All her subjects used to do.

The extreme of their brutality

While trying to overpower we.

 

Me, not Black, but a proud Taino lady.

Why should I celebrate Black History?

 

We could exchange stories and cry on our shoulders

Talking about those so-called discoverers

But while we won’t hide the facts from the young ones

We have to be strong so we can move on

We have to hold hands and with conviction we must say

NO MAS …  NO MORE … GENOEG… …. ASSEZ

We must join voices and say NEVER AGAIN

Will our people endure such shame and pain

No matter how they come or what gifts they bear

We must be on alert every day of the year

 

Me, not Black, but a proud Taino lady.

Why should I celebrate Black History?

 

I celebrate Black history

Because when I hear your story

And I remember My story

I ask God for the strength to fight on and stay FREE.



This poem was written for and read by Obeylin Martinez-Diaz,
a young lady from the Dominican Republic and descendant of the Taino Indian Tribe.